COMMUNIQUE 28

Communiqué #028

TO MY PARTNERS in MINISTRY

to the PEOPLE of HAITI

July 17, 2006

 

 

 

It was 4:00AM when the neighborhood that surrounds the boys’ orphanage began hearing the cries of a baby.  By daylight, the baby was still crying.  At about 8:00 AM, a lady disposing of her garbage investigated the crying only to find a small boy that had been abandoned in the darkness.  The lady took the boy home knowing that she did not have the means to care for the boy.  She contacted the police to obtain abandonment papers for proof that she had not stolen the child.  Almost as soon as I returned to Haiti from helping my daughter and her family move to their new home in the state of Wyoming, the lady sent a request via Léon to find out if I would discuss with the Izidors about taking this child into the orphanage.  A few days later, the woman arrived with the little boy dressed in the clothes that she had found him in.  I held the little one, as she explained how she did not have clothes, diapers or food for the child.  She asked if we could take him.  As I held the precious bundle, I could tell from his limp body and red-tinged hair that he was badly malnourished.  He was so sleepy that his head kept nodding, but he refused to lay his head on my shoulder, even when I gently tried to encourage him to do so.  It was apparent that he was afraid to go to sleep lest he be abandoned again.  Leonie Izidor explained to the lady that we would first need to send the little one for medical testing to learn if he would be eligible to come to the orphanage.  We loaded up the woman with clothes, diapers and milk and assured her we would be in contact with her.  We then made arrangements for one of the orphanage staff members to take the child to the hospital for testing the following day.  During the time that the staff member spent with the child the next day, she reported that he had kept calling out for his papa!   Other than those words, we have no knowledge of his background, as he is too young to tell us.  We do not know how old he is or what his name is.  Leonie has appropriately decided to name him Moise (Moses in English).  Just looking at his huge, sad eyes makes me want to grab him up and squeeze away all of the pain!   The hard life in Haiti leads mothers to decisions like the one that resulted in Moise being abandoned near the orphanage.  Could it be that the parent was hoping that the orphanage would hear the cries and rescue this child???   We can only guess!

 

Please pray for little Moise!  Pray also that we able to hire an appropriate caregiver. Under normal circumstances, we do not take in children until they are out of diapers and no longer in need of one-on-one care.  We do not have funds for purchasing expensive baby formula and we do not have sufficient staff to give the extra attention required for a baby who needs bottles and diaper changes both day and night.  But with Moise, we feel God has placed him in our care and now we must find just such a caregiver!

 

Haiti is a land of so much heart break!   I recently received a short, but insightful email from a friend.  He simply said, “Thank you for what you do.  Sometimes I forget how emotionally tough it must be.”    I thank God for friends like this who remember us when we get discouraged.  It happens more than I anticipated and it is OH-SO-GOOD to know that prayers are sent heavenward that will continue to sustain and encourage us in our work!  Thank you for remembering us and the people of Haiti!

 

 

Nora Nunemaker

Missionary to Haiti & the Dominican Republic                       Until next time ………….

 

 

About Nora Léon

Executive Director for Caribbean Children's Foundation Missionary to HAITI and the DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
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1 Response to COMMUNIQUE 28

  1. Unknown says:

    Nora
    How much will it cost to support Mosie per month? Let us know how we can help.
    Lee Genter

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